Cycle commuting intention: A model based on theory of planned behaviour and social identity

año

2015

autorxs

Lois, D., Moriano, J. A., & Rondinella, G.

en

Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour

tipo de publicación

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Although cycling as a mode of transport can provide various important benefits to cities and their transport systems, it accounts for only a small proportion of commuter trips in southern Europe. The aim of this study was to develop a new model based on Ajzen’s (1991) theory of planned behaviour (TPB), but including social identity as an additional predictor variable to improve the explanatory capability of the TPB. We conducted a tele- phone survey of a representative sample of 595 non-cycle commuters in the Spanish city of Vitoria-Gasteiz, which has a moderate proportion of bicycle users (6.9%). Confirmatory fac- tor analysis to test the model showed satisfactory overall measurement fit, and all sub-scales had high reliability and validity coefficients. The findings demonstrated the value of incorporating social identity into the TPB to capture motivational factors relevant to cycle commuting. The relationships between the factors in the model indicated that there is a strong link between identifying as ‘a cyclist’ and perceived self-efficacy with respect to cycling. Furthermore, the results suggest that a more specific measure of per- ceived self-efficacy, targeting concrete behaviours could be used to inform development of initiatives to promote urban cycling. Our data also revealed that, excluding control vari- ables such as journey time, economic cost and distance, the psychosocial variables included in the model predicted 32% of the variance in car users’ intention to start commuting by bicycle.

Lois, D., Moriano, J. A., & Rondinella, G. (2015). Cycle commuting intention: A model based on theory of planned behaviour and social identity. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, 32, 101–113. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trf.2015.05.003

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